With their rich heritage and their construction and architectural characteristics, the Remarkable Bridges of the South of France now form a network that serves to highlight their complementary nature.

They can be found around the Millau Viaduct area and, like the Viaduct, these constructions form part of French heritage.

Le Pont du Diable (the Devil's Bridge)

This is the centrepiece of the Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert – Gorges de l’Hérault Great Tourist Site of France and was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1998 as part of the Santiago de Compostela Pilgrimage Route. Its layout has been adapted to enhance its protection while facilitating access both to the bridge and its beach.

Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert 

Le Pont du Gard

This is the highest Roman aqueduct-bridge in the world and is on the UNESCO World Heritage List. This architectural masterpiece is the most monumental structure on an aqueduct that is 50kms long and that was built 2,000 years ago in order to provide the town of Nîmes with running water. This treasure of humanity is set amid a natural background and is listed as one of France’s Great Tourist Sites.

Pont du Gard 

The Garabit Viaduct

Built by Gustave Eiffel, in the heart of the Massif Central (Cantal département), this railway bridge has been combining power and elegance for 130 years. It is a work of human genius which opened the railways to the South of France and, at the end of the 19th century, was the biggest metallic structure in the world.

The Garabit Viaduct

The Valentré bridge in Cahors

This bridge is the jewel in the heritage of the city of Cahors. It was built in the 14th century, listed as a Historic Monument as early as 1840 and restored in the 19th century. It was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1998 as part of the Santiago de Compostela Pilgrimage Route. It is the most representative and best preserved medieval fortified bridge in France.

Valentré bridge